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We need a cottage food law to allow the production of local foods in our community. Cottage food production allows a community choice, variety and the opportunity to the local economy viable.
When employment plummets and jobs are scare, a cottage food law allows food crafters, home-based bakers and home food processors the opportunity to make extra…

We need a cottage food law to allow the production of local foods in our community. Cottage food production allows a community choice, variety and the opportunity to the local economy viable.
When employment plummets and jobs are scare, a cottage food law allows food crafters, home-based bakers and home food processors the opportunity to make extra income by selling their signature food products. The income from these small businesses may not be substantial in the eyes of a government official, or someone who is working full-time; however to those struggling to make ends meet, every dollar is of value.
A “Cottage Food Law” allows state residents to use their own kitchen facility to produce food items that are not potentially hazardous, including but not limited to bakery products, jams, jellies, candy, dry mixes, spices and some sauces.

“Cottage Food Laws” are different for every state so home-based bakers and food processors must check with their individual state regulatory agency, which might be their State Department of Agriculture or their local health department to learn about specific rules, regulations and labeling requirements for processing and selling food processed in a home kitchen. It should be noted that there are states that have no “Cottage Food Law” and do not allow under any condition the processing of foods from the home kitchen; in those states a licensed commercial kitchen must be used.

A “Cottage Food Law” may or may require that a home-based baker/home food processor not be exempt from inspection and licensing; it will dependin on the state in which the food processor resides. For example in the state of North Carolina a compliance officer from the North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services will come to the food processor’s home and inspect it. In addition, many food products, including those produced and packaged by a “Cottage Food Production Operation”, may be subject to a food label inspection, food sampling conducted by the regulatory agency involved to determine if a food product is misbranded or contaminated.

It should also be mentioned that, not all areas of a state allow home food processing, for example in many urban areas of Pennsylvania you cannot bake or process foods from the home kitchen; it is limited to specific counties and rural communities.

Not all state or local laws are the same and it is the responsibility of the individual food processor to learn what laws and regulations are applicable to their community. Food processors are allowed to sell their products at Farmer’s Markets, to the general public and in some cases wholesale and online depending on the regulatory agency rules for sales and distribution.

Does your state have a cottage food law?

Read more http://cottagefoodlaws.com/state-regulations/why-need-cottage-food-law/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=why-need-cottage-food-law

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